Recent Posts

Oppenheimer Review: An Intense Journey Into Atomic Madness

Christopher Nolan’s films feel like jazz symphonies. There’s a rhythm to them. Scenes build on one another in such a way that creates an almost hypnotic quality. This is achieved mainly through his non-linear storytelling, cross-cutting scenes at different times, and sound and music. Nolan often employs editing to manipulate …

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Asteroid City Review: Quirky Fun With Something to Think About

Wes Anderson is admittedly an acquired taste. He is known for his distinctive visual style and whimsical storytelling, creating films with eccentric characters and meticulously crafted aesthetics. There’s none like a Wes Anderson movie when you’re watching it. Everything in one of his shots is meticulously crafted down to the …

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Another Look: Point Break (1991)

Point Break is one of those rare sublime films that are enjoyable and transcendent. Far from the mindless action cinema that preceded it a decade earlier in the 80s, Kathryn Bigelow’s film has themes and depth and is trying to pose interesting questions. Indeed, Point Break incorporates elements that challenge …

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Ten Overrated Films That Came Out During My Life

I was sitting around the other day thinking about what to write about next and decided I have been too nice. You’ll notice no reviews on this website where I out and out-crush a film or post any controversial opinions. It’s not good to hold onto one’s negativity or troll-like …

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Unsung Cinema: The Grey Zone (2001)

Holocaust films can be tough viewing, and rightly so, but it also serves as a brutal and stark reminder of the Nazi regime. The Holocaust was a genocide during World War II, primarily targeting the Jewish population by the Nazi regime under Adolf Hitler’s leadership in Germany. It is estimated …

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Unsung Cinema: The People Under the Stairs (1991)

Wes Craven’s The People Under the Stairs is a masterclass in horror filmmaking that expertly blends chilling terror, social commentary, and riveting storytelling. Released in 1991, the film showcases Craven’s ability to create an atmosphere of dread while delving into thought-provoking themes. It does qualify for Unsung Cinema despite the …

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Unsung Cinema: Man on Fire (2004)

“Revenge is a meal best served cold.” Denzel Washington’s Creasy ponders at one point during Man on Fire. This is a common saying repeated in many revenge thriller films. What Man on Fire has to add to the genre isn’t particularly new; the narrative beats we’ve all seen before; it’s …

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Sisu is Ridiculous Nazi Killing Good Time

Sometimes a film is exactly what you think it’s about. As far as I can tell, there is no deeper meaning to Jalmari Helander’s Sisu. The Finnish film is based on some historical fact, but there’s no doubt of its intention to provide a lean 90 minutes of extraordinarily gory …

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Beau Is Afraid is a Wildly Inventive and Surreal Comic Nightmare

Finally, 2023 has produced its first genuinely noteworthy film released in a sizable amount of theaters. Ari Aster’s third feature Beau Is Afraid, has no shot at commercial glory this weekend. It’s not made for mass consumption, and it’ll likely baffle many people, and that’s ok. I’m not sure if …

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Renfield is Two Movies That Don’t Mesh Well

What a spectacular missed opportunity Chris McKay’s Renfield is. The screenplay by Ryan Ridley, based on a story from The Walking Dead creator Robert Kirkman (that’s a big name to have attached to this project), is hampered by focusing on characters not named Dracula and Renfield. Despite some cleverness in …

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Unsung Cinema: In The Electric Mist (2009)

Bertrand Tavernier’s In The Electric Mist takes a well-worn formula (small-town Southern cop story) and adds some added weight and levity. Think of it as a John Grisham movie without lawyers and with a pulse. The film is based on the novel In the Electric Mist with Confederate Dead by …

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Another Look: The Long Goodbye (1973)

Robert Altman’s The Long Goodbye immediately establishes the mood and tone of the picture perfectly. It’s a classic Altman sequence that refuses to rush things as we enter this world of updated Raymond Chandler for the 1970s. Elliott Gould’s Philip Marlowe is awoken by his cat at 3 in the …

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